MINIMAL SUE

fotojournalismus:

An Indian woman carries her child on her back and works in a paddy field on the outskirts of Gauhati, India on September 12, 2014. (Anupam Nath/AP)

fotojournalismus:

An Indian woman carries her child on her back and works in a paddy field on the outskirts of Gauhati, India on September 12, 2014. (Anupam Nath/AP)

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: I spotted this recent wall-piece by Richard Nonas, called “Crude Thinking”, in his solo show at Fergus McCaffrey gallery in New York. Funny thing is, I saw it with an art-critic friend who finds  this kind of pared-down abstraction too cerebral to have any life, beyond what a critic can give it by dressing it up in fancy words. Whereas my problem with this work – if you can call it a problem – is that it seems too obviously, easily loveable. For me, this is just what art is obviously supposed to look like to give pleasure.
Do you think the difference has anything to do with the fact that my friend came to art a bit later, in the postmodern 1980s and 90s, whereas I happened to be surrounded by late abstraction as a child? We lived a short bike ride from Montreal’s original Museum of Contemporary Art, and Nonas’s work is just what I would see on any given weekend in the early 1970s when my siblings and I would cycle over.
My new theory: Critics, and all aesthetes, imprint, duckling-like, on the first art they come to see; the rest of an aesthetic life is spent either seeking that same familiar pleasure, or trying to find new, less obvious joys that will push you beyond the one that lives deep in your heart. Either way, the childhood conditioning is inescapable.
That’s why I  worry about all the Thomas Kinkades in American homes… (Courtesy Fergus McCaffrey)

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blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: I spotted this recent wall-piece by Richard Nonas, called “Crude Thinking”, in his solo show at Fergus McCaffrey gallery in New York. Funny thing is, I saw it with an art-critic friend who finds  this kind of pared-down abstraction too cerebral to have any life, beyond what a critic can give it by dressing it up in fancy words. Whereas my problem with this work – if you can call it a problem – is that it seems too obviously, easily loveable. For me, this is just what art is obviously supposed to look like to give pleasure.

Do you think the difference has anything to do with the fact that my friend came to art a bit later, in the postmodern 1980s and 90s, whereas I happened to be surrounded by late abstraction as a child? We lived a short bike ride from Montreal’s original Museum of Contemporary Art, and Nonas’s work is just what I would see on any given weekend in the early 1970s when my siblings and I would cycle over.

My new theory: Critics, and all aesthetes, imprint, duckling-like, on the first art they come to see; the rest of an aesthetic life is spent either seeking that same familiar pleasure, or trying to find new, less obvious joys that will push you beyond the one that lives deep in your heart. Either way, the childhood conditioning is inescapable.

That’s why I  worry about all the Thomas Kinkades in American homes… (Courtesy Fergus McCaffrey)

Like the discussion!

saatchiart:

Crystal Wagner makes colorful installations from cut paper and chicken wire. We love “Deluge,” seen here.

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(Source: saatchiart.com)

fotojournalismus:

A goat is tied to one of the roadside tobacco shops, as owners wait for customers, in New Delhi, India on September 3, 2014. (Manish Swarup/AP)

fotojournalismus:

A goat is tied to one of the roadside tobacco shops, as owners wait for customers, in New Delhi, India on September 3, 2014. (Manish Swarup/AP)

fotojournalismus:

Artisans from Kolkata prepare idols of Hindu gods and goddesses for the upcoming Durga Puja festival, at a workshop in Allahabad, India on Sept. 5, 2014. (Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP)

fotojournalismus:

Artisans from Kolkata prepare idols of Hindu gods and goddesses for the upcoming Durga Puja festival, at a workshop in Allahabad, India on Sept. 5, 2014. (Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP)

art21:

"There is an overall agreement that I have with myself as I start something. That agreement is based on a judgment." —Katharina Grosse

In this week’s Season 7 preview, artist Katharina Grosse describes a “thought-based” approach to creating work. Shown at work from Amaral Custom Fabrications in Bristol, Rhode Island, the artist spray paints sculptural elements for Just Two of Us—her 2013 exhibition for Public Art Fund (publicartfund) at MetroTech Commons in Brooklyn, New York.

WATCH: Preview of Katharina Grosse in Fiction

Season 7 of ART21 Art in the Twenty-First Century premieres Friday, October 24, 2014 at 10:00 p.m. ET on PBS (check local listings). Fiction airs Friday, November 14, 2014.

IMAGES: Production stills from the ART21 Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 7 episode, Fiction, 2014. © ART21, Inc. 2014.

(via publicartfund)